Drain Plug

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Drain Plug

Postby mainefalcon » Fri Nov 27, 2009 4:25 pm

Hi All,

My falcon doesn't have a drain plug, which seems odd for a boat this size. If anyone has a suggestion on what type to install, I'd appreciate it.
Thanks,
John
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Re: Drain Plug

Postby DaveD » Sat Nov 28, 2009 1:49 am

No drainplug?? Is there a hole? Or is the plug just missing?

I just had to buy a new one for mine. (the old one was cracked)

I think they were about 10 bucks for 2 at West Marine.

I never removed my plug the entire season. I had the cockpit covered with a tarp over the boom, so not much rain got in when it was moored.
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Re: Drain Plug

Postby mainefalcon » Sun Nov 29, 2009 11:03 pm

There's no hole, so I'm going to have to drill a hole in the boat. I've seen some with a drain plug in the bottom of the boat, and others (like my powerboat has) with the drainplug in the transom, all the way at the bottom. If anyone can tell me the best place to install it, and what type, that would be great. Thanks.
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Re: Drain Plug

Postby DaveD » Mon Nov 30, 2009 1:14 am

OK.

Here is how mine is setup. Sorry for the crappy old pics, but these are the only ones I have of the stern and transom. My boat is covered and stored for the winter until March, but I can take newer better pictures after then. :(

The hull design and form had a "skeg" which is a deepening of the keel inline with the swing keel to keep the "arse end" of the boat straight when sailing with the winds on your beam and upwind.

When my boat was moulded, it left an indentation where the skeg dips.

Like so:
P1010151.jpg
P1010151.jpg (452.31 KiB) Viewed 7123 times


My drain plug is at the top of this depression, and you can see it from the outside here:
P1010148.JPG
P1010148.JPG (157.6 KiB) Viewed 7121 times


I don't think the size matters as long as it is within reason. They sell kits all over the web.

Here is a HOWTO on how to install them, it also includes instructions for a self-bailer. http://www.shortypen.com/essays/drain/

I've considered self bailers, but I often leave my boat in the water for a week at a time on camping trips, and I envisioned a snail or something holding the bailer open, so I've been hesitant.

Good luck, let me know if I can help more.

--DD
A bad day sailing is better than a good day at work...
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Re: Drain Plug

Postby mainefalcon » Mon Nov 30, 2009 10:09 am

Thanks Dave,
That's probably what I'll do. I'm also thinking about using the same type of self-bailer that's on my Sunfish. It works great; the only drawback is it would have to be installed either side of the keel instead of dead-center, making it difficult to drain all the water out. I'll let you know how it works out. Thanks.
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Re: Drain Plug

Postby DaveD » Tue Dec 01, 2009 12:54 pm

I'm not sure of your sailing "style", hee hee..

But the Falcon isn't really a boat designed to "get wet", like the sunfish, or laser. So I would think a self bailer would be a little overkill. Just my honest opinion.

One thing I noticed with this boat is the lack of flotation. Your money might be better spent in that vs. a $100 self bailing system.
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Re: Drain Plug

Postby mainefalcon » Wed Dec 02, 2009 11:35 pm

Hi Dave,

After looking at my Falcon this a.m. I discovered there is a very small hole (about .25" )drilled in the transom, in the same place as your drain plug. I'm not sure what was used to plug that hole when the boat was in the water. I'll have to prop trailer up a bit higher so water can drain out, and in the spring, I'll enlarge the hole and install a threaded garboard drain plug.

Another question: Is there any wood in the transom, or is it all fiberglass? Thanks.
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Re: Drain Plug

Postby DaveD » Thu Jan 14, 2010 3:07 am

My transom is all fiberglass.
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Re: Drain Plug

Postby mainefalcon » Wed Feb 03, 2010 7:05 pm

Hi,

I recently bought a brass garboard drain plug; I have one on my powerboat and it's great, so I figured I'll stick with what works. I had to enlarge the hole in the transom to 1" and then drilled pilot holes to mount the brass fitting. Now that I can see a cross-section of the transom as a result of the larger hole, I can see my transom is all fiberglass too--very surprising, and also making it difficult to drive a brass screw into it without breaking it off. Since the Falcon was the 1st sailboat designed for fiberglass construction, I'm sure they used way more fiberglass than necessary, in all parts of the boat. It may be heavy, but at least it won't rot.
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Re: Drain Plug

Postby DaveD » Wed Feb 03, 2010 7:38 pm

Someone may correct me if I'm wrong (which I am more often then not...)

I think these boats are made with plastic (petroleum) based resins, so essentially it's plastic coated fiberglass. As a consequence, they had to make hulls thicker. Todays boats are made with epoxy based resin, allowing for thinner, more lightweight hulls.

I've drilled holes for navigation lights and different gear and it seems the hull is over a quarter inch thick in most places. I'm shocked at how much this boat weighs.

When I was getting it licensed, I had to weigh the trailer, and I didn't want to launch my unfinished boat since they just wanted to see if it was under 2500lbs. (government policy, sheesh). The trailer with the boat weighed in at 860lbs without the mast, floor boards, and the rest of the gear. With all of that in, I bet she weighs close to 700 in the water and rigged.

In the cockpit she's pretty sturdy walking around, but if you walk on the deck, make sure to keep your weight balanced on center and don't step too close to the gunwales... you wind up in the drink (not that I have experienced it, but close).
A bad day sailing is better than a good day at work...
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