Deck Non-Skid

Restoring your Falcon? Come in for tips, and share your knowledge.

Deck Non-Skid

Postby DaveD » Sun May 17, 2009 7:34 pm

Here are a before and after of the Non-Skid deck (Interlux Innerdeck)

Before:
IMG_2624.jpg
IMG_2624.jpg (345.26 KiB) Viewed 4106 times


After:
IMG_2639.jpg
IMG_2639.jpg (248.42 KiB) Viewed 4107 times
A bad day sailing is better than a good day at work...
DaveD
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Re: Deck Non-Skid

Postby yar1243 » Mon May 18, 2009 7:33 pm

That looks good Dave. My deck and cockpit floor is full of pits and the gelcoat is flaking off and cracked down to the white gelcoat. I would have to sand and completely cover it with epoxy. I contacted Kiwi grip and they said it would fill in the pits nicely. I also bought a gallon of white roof coating that is an elastomeric styrene acrylic polymer that is is very flexible. I'm going to experiment with it and see what it does. The floor of the hull liner in #1243 is thin and flexes quite a bit so I don't know if interdeck would hold up to the flexing. If the roof stuff doesn't work I guess I'll have to epoxy the floor. It looks like someone has done that to Poncho's(I think it is Poncho's) Falcon. The white portions of the gelcoat are in good shape so is the hull. I'll send some more pics after I'm done.
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Re: Deck Non-Skid

Postby DaveD » Tue May 19, 2009 12:32 am

I have been painting and working on the boat like a man possessed. I'm hoping for a maiden voyage on Memorial Day...

When I got mine, it looked like someone took a shot gun to the deck. It was full of pits and chips and bubbles.

The reason is that fiberglass boats were still a fairly new concept and the chemistry involved in it was still in the works. They also didn't take the car to protect BOTH sides.

The bubbles are a result from moisture locked behind the gelcoat (or absorbed via the fiber underneath) and when heated by the sun or frozen in the winter time, it expands and pops.

I realized that I was going to have to repair them and protect it from getting them again. I talked to lots of owners of 50s, 60s, 70s fiber glass boats, that have restored their fiberglass, gelcoat and paint...one thing was in common with all of them: West System Epoxy. The reason is that WS is very, very, very strong, durable, and stable. You can use it as a filler, bridge gaps, adhesion, fiberglass resin (YOUR COCKPIT FLOOR!), carbon fiber. Their customer support was fantastic.

I didn't really want to spend the money for it, but in the long run I am so glad I did.

There are a couple of ways to ease the cost.

#1. If you have a West Marine store near you, you can sign up for their preferred buyer. You get a 30 day "New Boaters" discount of 10%.
#2. West Marine will price match online stores within reason.
#3. The best price for West System Epoxy is the starter Kit on Jamestown Distributors site. Here is the link http://www.jamestowndistributors.com/userportal/show_product.do?pid=3842&familyName=WEST+System+Epoxy+Kit. Print that out, and go into West Marine.

Depending on your climate, you will either get the fast or slow hardener. I live in the Midwest, and I wanted to work in the winter so I got the 205 fast. You will also want to get the 404 High Density Filler. That is what you would use to fill the pits.

That price maybe steep, but that kit will cover you for whatever you will want to do. With your boat.... YOU WILL USE IT ALL (on other boat projects).

As far as your cockpit floor is concerned, have you had a look in the bilge? See what's in there? My stringers were completely rotted out. I actually had to replace them.

Either way you go, I'll be around to answer questions.
A bad day sailing is better than a good day at work...
DaveD
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Re: Deck Non-Skid

Postby DaveD » Sat Jun 20, 2009 2:24 am

One thing about the Innerdeck is that there is no mixing of parts, just stir the can and paint it on.

It filled some imperfections in my paint also and did very well.

I would have one recommendation before you walk on it or step on it...bake it in the sun for a bit to harden it up.
A bad day sailing is better than a good day at work...
DaveD
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Posts: 167
Joined: Thu Jul 17, 2008 11:38 pm


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