Oh how much gelcoat there is

Restoring your Falcon? Come in for tips, and share your knowledge.

Oh how much gelcoat there is

Postby rimike82 » Mon Jun 06, 2011 5:38 pm

I cannot believe how much gelcoat/fairing compound there is on these boats, and I have to remove all of it. Forget grinding with the dust everywhere. My solution, forget the $2k gelplane, I am going with the Harbor Freight Tools planer, here is a pic so far after about five minutes. I hooked a vac up to the outlet, no dust, no cleanup, I should be able to get through this in no time.
Attachments
gel stipping.jpg
5 minutes work, not bad so far.
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Re: Oh how much gelcoat there is

Postby joecomet » Mon Jun 20, 2011 2:33 pm

Looks like a lot work!! I really admire your efforts to restore a boat in this shape. How many gorillas did it take to turn the boat over?
Keep up the good work
Joseph from Tallahassee
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Re: Oh how much gelcoat there is

Postby rimike82 » Mon Jun 20, 2011 5:14 pm

Just me. I have removed all the old gelcoat and uncovered a bunch on poor repairs here and there. Also some areas of the hull were alittle thin on fiberglass, so I added two layers of 10 oz cloth over it. I still need fair it and sand it to get a good smooth bottom, then barrier coat it and I am off to the races.
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Re: Oh how much gelcoat there is

Postby DaveD » Mon Jun 20, 2011 9:27 pm

Fantastic.

I think this is the work that most of us would have liked to do, but lacked the knowledge, tools, space, or finances to do so.. :)

Keep up the good work. This is a "true" restoration.
A bad day sailing is better than a good day at work...
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Re: Oh how much gelcoat there is

Postby William » Tue Jun 21, 2011 6:54 am

I agree Dave, although one nice thing about having a Falcon is that you feel free to experiment and learn on them because unlike more popular boats there is not a lot of "class" conciousness. Falcon owners seem to want to personalize and customize rather than factoryrestore hence the great color schemes we see in photos.
William
Sailing Theodora every day (I wish)
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Re: Oh how much gelcoat there is

Postby rimike82 » Tue Jun 21, 2011 1:01 pm

Actually, i am a poor college student, so I am doing this on a super budget. As far as tools, all are Harbor Freight except the 7" grinder, which is Dewalt. For the supplies, I go to Jamestown Distributors storefront, a lot of time they have returned items that they can't resell, like already cut fiberglass cloth and resin. That is how I am doing this so cheaply.
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Re: Oh how much gelcoat there is

Postby DaveD » Fri Jun 24, 2011 11:24 am

JEALOUS! Jamestown store front!

Either way, welcome to this rewarding hobby.

The beauty of restoring a boat is you just need to get it to a point where you can sail. The other stuff you can tinker on over the years. I think that is the most rewarding part about having these boats is the increase in performance or looks when you finish a project.

Money doth not make a good sailor.
A bad day sailing is better than a good day at work...
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Re: Oh how much gelcoat there is

Postby sepeman » Mon Jun 27, 2011 10:58 pm

You said in your first post that you used a planer. Is this a hand held electric planer? How did you do this?
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Re: Oh how much gelcoat there is

Postby rimike82 » Wed Jun 29, 2011 10:10 pm

I used an electric planer from harbor freight tools. http://www.harborfreight.com/3-1-4-quarter-inch-electric-planer-95838.html I went bow to stern, its is loud as heck, but the results were great. I was quick, and there was not to much dust. I also used a vac attached to the planer outlet to suck everything away. Then I used a 7" grinder to remove the rest and smooth out everything. Oh, I used the shallowest setting, removing a little at a time, I only gouged it bad once, but nothing that filler and fiberglass can't fix.
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Re: Oh how much gelcoat there is

Postby Gebralter » Fri May 17, 2013 11:34 am

Read your bottom restoration story and have a great need for some help! Have inherited an old late fifties Falcon that the bottom is so bad that it has to be completely removed and resurfaced (new member Gebralter w/pics). The bottom has proven to be very uneven when i finally get the CONCRETE off and start to see the original fiberglass. there is some kind of rough filler used to even out the last effort to refinish the bottom ten years ago. I have been told that the fiberglass was probably not completely dry when it was last done. To start with, when you said you put two layers of fiberglass over the bottom, was it the entire raw part or just patches? Then you used a filler? What did you use? When the bottom is smooth what then, special undercoat? then paint? then did you have to regelcoat it? Wow am I in deeper than I thought, I don't have a clue. Any help would be GREATLY appreciated. I'm removing the bottom a square foot at a time at about two hours a foot, so I have a long time to wait for any answers anyone can through my way!

George
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Re: Oh how much gelcoat there is

Postby rimike82 » Tue Aug 27, 2013 7:03 pm

To give you an idea and order of what I did:

-Planned off the old gel coat
-Ground down the ridges and rest of the hull to smooth everything out with 80 grit
-Filled and fared any low spots, sanded them smooth
-Then I re-covered the entire hull with two(2) layers of 6oz cloth.
-Then I sanded the bottom smooth (You shouldn't have to do much sanding if you laid up the glass really well, this step is to rough up the glass for the primer to stick to)
-Since I was planning on leaving the boat in the water, I applied a barrier coat (Here is the link:http://www.westmarine.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/ProductDisplay?productId=93437&catalogId=10001&langId=-1&storeId=11151&storeNum=50218&subdeptNum=50229&classNum=50236#.Uh0ulLZGQTk)
-I then needed to establish the water line. To do this, I ballested the boat with about 200 lbs with where the mast is, and another 100 lbs behind the centerboard. I then went really early to the ramp in the morning with a garbage bag full of saw dust. Launch the boat and wait for it to settle and sit still. Once thats done, throw the saw dust in the water around the hull and and it will cling to the waterline. Then ground around the boat while its in the water and put sharpie marks every 2" above the waterline every 3 feet or so. Haul the boat and bring it back to your house.
-get a laser and shoot it across the hull at the sharpie marks and get fine line tape and tape from the marks up. I then flipped the boat and applied a bottom paint.
-Flip the boat back over and tape the bottom paint (once dried of course) and paint from the bottom paint up.

Whola, that is the proper method for painting a hull.
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