Inside Cabin Before and After...

Restoring your Falcon? Come in for tips, and share your knowledge.

Inside Cabin Before and After...

Postby DaveD » Mon Oct 06, 2008 11:44 pm

Well, got a bit done on the boat last weekend.

Step 1.
Scrub a dub dub, with Simple Green and a good powerwash (low pressure), cut out old rotten stringers by cutting out the fiberglass strapping and kept the old wood in tact as much as possible to use them as rough patterns.

Step 2.
Dried the boat by storing in a heated garage all winter, and summer and winter...

Step 3.
Cut new stringers using Dried Pressure Treated lumber. This is what I had laying around...
I coated the stringers using 100% West System epoxy (2 coats)...This is why I didn't use Oak, because I was going to do this step anyway.

Step 4.
Scraped down the interior of the hull, removing any loose paint chips that remained, and vacuumed it out.

Step 5.
Bolted the new stringers to the old straps using stainless steel 1/4 bolts...before I set them in, I laid down a bead of 3M 5200 Fast Cure Marine Adhesive/Sealant.
This stuff is invaluable to rebuilding an old boat. Don't even bother with the small tube, get the caulk gun size. Many more uses.

Step 6.
Two good coats of Interlux Pre-Kote White (Brushed). It took 2 quarts to do the inside of the hull, this is cheaper than using Brightside, it fills the space and makes bonding for the BrightSide easy.

Step 7.
Two good coats of Interlux BrightSide White (Sponge Roller, and using a foam brush to "tip" it out and drag out the bubbles). When you are done, you can't tell it was rolled.

And here are the before and afters:
P1010155.jpg
P1010155.jpg (54.14 KiB) Viewed 5329 times


and:

IMG_1718.jpg
IMG_1718.jpg (39.63 KiB) Viewed 5328 times
A bad day sailing is better than a good day at work...
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Re: Inside Cabin Before and After...

Postby DaveD » Wed Mar 18, 2009 12:05 am

Cover is off!!

Ready for interior wood, and exterior/bottom paint.
A bad day sailing is better than a good day at work...
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Re: Inside Cabin Before and After...

Postby laybacklenny » Sun May 17, 2009 8:07 pm

Would love to see a pic of your boat from a distance.
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Re: Inside Cabin Before and After...

Postby DaveD » Sun May 17, 2009 8:51 pm

Soon!!

I'll have it out of the garage to rig it up...
A bad day sailing is better than a good day at work...
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Re: Inside Cabin Before and After...

Postby joecomet » Wed Aug 25, 2010 1:00 am

David
This interior shot was taken in the early stages of overhaul I presume, as I don't see the wood work around the centerboard trunk that I see in later pics. I see that you built a wooden cover or framework over the centerboard trunk. You also have mounted you final mainsheet hardware on the top of the the cover. How did you fasten the wood work to the trunk without screw holes that would leak, or if you did use screws, what did you bed them with? I am sure it must be secure as there would be a lot of force on the hardware and top.
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Re: Inside Cabin Before and After...

Postby DaveD » Wed Aug 25, 2010 10:15 am

The cover is actually attached to the floor boards using 2 1/2 stainless screws. The floor boards are also secured in the same fashion to the stringers. I will stress STAINLESS HARDWARE FOR EVERYTHING. Don't buy it at a marine store, there is no difference between stainless at Home Depot, or Ace Hardware. It's often half the price at the home centers. Also, buy bulk if you are redoing the entire boat. You'll save even more.

The parts of the cover are mahogany and are original. I sanded them and then reassembled them with Gorilla glue except for the top plate where the main sheet is attached. I left it lose on purpose so I could get at the hardware attached to it. The mainsheet block is actually bolted to that top plate, and i added a 1/8" aluminum backer plate so the bolts wouldn't pull through. *I recommend backing ALL of your hardware to prevent mishaps* The only place that the cover is secured to the locker is a small screw at the front of the cover (up by the lever) that goes into (not through) the locker to keep it from wiggling around.

I did bed the stringers to the bottom with 3M 5200 marine adhesive/sealant. That stuff is as tough as nails. You can also use it on through-hull applications (think drain plugs, bailers etc.) DO NOT use the 5200 if you intend on removing it later, you will take a chunk of whatever it's glued to with it. I'm serious. :)

How strong can that plate and cover setup be? I was just out this last weekend in 10-20 kts and 1-2 ft waves, that turned into 20-30 and 2-4 ft chop in about 30 minutes. Small craft advisory. The top of my mast was actually bent over about 3 degrees leeward (above the stays). Answer your questions?

If you have it rigged and setup like mine, you shouldn't have any issues. With the mainsheet traveller setup in on the stern, you have 2 points of stress on the boom, so it's not as bad on the main sheet block.
A bad day sailing is better than a good day at work...
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